Jujutsu Kaisen attraction with new storyline coming to Universal Studios Japan

Things won’t be getting off to a smooth start at Osaka Curse Technical High School.

There’s no clearer sign that an anime series has truly become part of the pop cultural zeitgeist in Japan than when it gets a Universal Studios Japan attraction. It happened for Demon Slayer, Sailor Moon, and Evangelion, and now it’s happening for Jujutsu Kaisen.

The Osaka theme park has announced that it’s developing Jujutsu Kaisen the Real 4-D, a theater show attraction featuring 3-D visuals and environmental effects such spraying water and shaking seats. Rather than retread an existing storyline from the franchise, Jujutsu Kaisen the Real 4-D will have an original plot, with the park describes with

“It has been decided that a new Curse Technical High School campus will open here in Osaka. You have been scouted by this new school and invited to attend the groundbreaking ceremony. According to the principal, Mr. Kuroishi, the purpose of the school is to train students to save people from harmful curses, which have been increasing in frequency in recent years.”

As you might suspect, though, the ceremony doesn’t go so smoothly, and an incident occurs that requires the supernaturally powered assistance of Jujutsu Kaisen protagonist Yuji and his friends to resolve.

Jujutsu Kaisen will also be making its presence felt on Universal Studios Japan’s flagship roller coaster, Hollywood Dream the Ride. Music always plays a big part in the riding experience, and the coaster’s cars will be playing the first opening theme of the Jujutsu Kaisen anime, Eve’s “Kaikai Kitan,” coinciding with the start of Jujutsu Kaisen the Real 4-D.

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Japanese photog’s stunning photo “captures” the Milky Way, as well as over 352,000 likes

Source: grapee.jp

“I captured the Milky Way.”

Such was the caption for a stunning photo in a Tweet that has garnered over 352,000 likes at the time of writing.

The contributor is ふぁれん Fahren (@fahrens_photo), a photographer whose photos of starry skies continue to delight followers on Twitter.

Take a look at the image which elicited comments such as “So beautiful…” and “Awesome! I think it’s a very nice composition”:

天の川を捕まえました pic.twitter.com/qxWJphTdz8

— ふぁれん (@fahrens_photo) July 6, 2022

Reproduced with permission from ふぁれん Fahren (@fahrens_photo)

It’s a truly beautiful and fantastic sight, as if a part of the starry sky had been cut out.

The location of the photo is the Hoshinomura Observatory in Tamura City, Fukushima Prefecture.

This image was created through 新星景写真 (shin seikei shasin | “new starscape photography”), a technique of image processing and compositing images of the starry sky taken while the camera is fixed on a tripod, etc.

Since the photo was published on July 6th, many people made comments alluding to the Star Festival, which takes place every year on July 7th. For example, one person commented: “I couldn’t see the starry sky in my area, so I’m glad I could enjoy the Milky Way by admiring this wonderful photo.”

There must be something special about the Milky Way that stays with us through time!

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Japanese chef shows how to turn leftover mochi into perfect castella pancakes

Source: grapee.jp

Often enjoyed at chic cafes, “perfect” fluffy Japanese soufflé pancakes are actually pretty easy to make at home once you learn how to switch up some ingredients.

There’s more than one way to fluff up your pancakes, however. Popular chef Mugi Rice (@HG7654321) often shares helpful and easy cooking tips to level up people’s kitchen skills, whether it be gourmet tofu recipes or making game-changing tempura sauce.

Earlier this year, Mugi Rice decided to show how turn leftover mochi (since it’s a popular New Year’s treat, many Japanese families have leftover batches at the beginning of the year) into delicious castella pancakes.

First, dice block of mochi into small fine pieces and add to the pancake mix.

Source: @HG7654321

Then pour the batter into a pan heated over very low heat, cover it and let sit for 15 minutes.

Source: @HG7654321
Source: @HG7654321

Turn over, cover, and cook for another 5 minutes, then it’s done!

Source: @HG7654321
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Genderless makeup artist Zutti Mattia wows with amazing makeover videos

Source: grapee.jp

Affiliated with the creative agency PPPSTUDIO, Zutti Mattia is a Japanese creator and makeup artist who promotes genderless beauty.

With a background as a former beauty consultant, they post videos on makeup and fashion on their YouTube and TikTok channels.

Zutti Mattia is particularly known for their amazing makeup transformations.

For example, in this video, they demonstrate how they can transform themselves to get a ハーフ顔 hāfu-gao, a look that emulates mixed-race features.

Using their favorite makeup products, they give themselves a gorgeous look. Crucial in this video is the eye makeup that highlights the eyes by carefully layering colors.

There’s also a video where Zutti explains the “cut-crease” method in more detail.

Viewers left comments such as: “So beautiful! and “It looks great on you,” as well as “I’m attracted to your friendly personality.”

In addition to makeup products, Zutti also has a wonderful collection of wigs to make the transformation complete.

The following video shows their collection. You can see how a wig can make a big difference in the impression created!

You can tell that Zutti is emotionally invested in each and every one of them. They’ve customized many of the wigs, dyeing them, adding hair, or arranging them in other ways.

Other popular videos include Zutti achieving “the face (of who) I want to be.”

For example, in this video, they create the unique look of the actors who play male parts in the Takarazuka Revue, Japan’s famous all-female musical theater troupe:

Zutti achieved this look through trial and error, trying their best to approach the image they had in mind.

It’s easy to follow along as they explain the process.

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Instant noodles “modified recipe” becomes a hot topic in Japan; Just add ingredients and boil?

Source: grapee.jp
  • “I really want to make this”
  • “It looks soooo good!”
  • “I’m hungry and I want to eat this now!”

Japanese chef and Twitter user 麦ライス Mugi Raisu (@HG7654321) received enthusiastic comments such as these after posting a noodle recipe.

The recipe uses “Sapporo Ichiban Miso Ramen,” a long-selling Japanese instant noodle product made by Sanyo Foods Co. and available in North America, Hong Kong, and other countries around the world.

Mugi Raisu says, “I made Sesame Soymilk Dandan Noodles with Sapporo Ichiban Miso Ramen and it tasted like a specialty restaurant!”

Recipe for Sesame Soymilk Dandan Noodles

Ingredients

  • 1 package of Sapporo Ichiban Miso Ramen
  • 300 ml soymilk
  • 2 tablespoons sesame paste (Chinese or Japanese made with roasted sesame, not Tahini)
  • 2/3 teaspoon Sichuan bean paste (dòubànjiàng)
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • A pinch of Chinese hot chili oil (or Japanese rāyu)

First, bring 300 ml of water to a boil in a pot and boil “Sapporo Ichiban Miso Ramen” noodles for 2 minutes.


Image reproduced with permission from 麦ライス Mugi Raisu (@HG7654321)

Then add the included broth powder, soymilk, sesame paste, Sichuan bean paste, sugar, and hot chili oil, bring to a boil, and voila!


Image reproduced with permission from 麦ライス Mugi Raisu (@HG7654321)

All you have to do is add seasonings and bring it to a boil again, so anyone can easily enjoy this recipe for a modified version of Sapporo Ichiban Miso Ramen. It also happens to be vegan as well!

You can add bok choy, soft-boiled eggs (marinated in seasonings for a Japanese nitamago), or thinly sliced green onion as toppings to make it more satisfying.

If you’re interested, why not give it a try?

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T-Rex turns shiba inu’s dog park visit into greatest weekend

Source: grapee.jp

A trip to the dog park is highlight of the week for many dogs, but Japanese Twitter user @kuroshibapeko made sure to make it special enough fun to last for weeks on end.

@kuroshibapeko recently shared a video of a very different type of dog park trip with their beloved shiba inu, Peko. As you can see in the video, Peko was treated to quite the exciting time, and the caption @kuroshibapeko shared the video with speaks for itself:

I had the greatest weekend with my dog.

愛犬と最高の週末過ごしてきました pic.twitter.com/5TmafQx2F3

— 暴君ぺこ (@kuroshibapeko) April 24, 2022

In a conveniently empty dog park, @kuroshibapeko is giving Peko quite the humorous chase in a giant dinosaur costume. Peko seems super enthused, and almost seems to be mocking them as they run circles around the flailing dinosaur and stopping and starting to give them a chance to catch up.

@kuroshibapeko explained that in order to not scare Peko with the costume, they first showed it to them at home and tried it on around them in order for the excitable shiba inu to get used to it.

Source: @kuroshibapeko

It certainly makes for quite the image!

jk
Source: @kuroshibapeko

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10 Interesting Edo Period Facts You Probably Did NOT Know

Sushi Etiquette Japan 6

The Edo Period, also known as the Tokugawa Period, was considered the last period of history that was considered ‘traditional’ and ‘olden’ Japan.

This era was characterized by strict samurai ruling, rapid economic growth, peace across the prefectures, borders closed, cultural revolutions, and in particular, the major urbanization of Japan.

For example, it was during this period that such forms of entertainment as Kabuki and Haiku became popular. It was also during this time that sushi came into existence!

In fact, there are many interesting cultural and traditional aspects of Japan that emerged during the Edo Period that you probably didn’t know.

Let’s have a look at some of them with these 10 Edo Period Facts!

1. Sushi was the ‘fast-food’ option of the Edo Period

Sushi may seem like a Japanese dish that has been around forever, but it was actually invented by a street vendor as a snack during the Edo Period.

Back then, it was tasty, nutritious and cheap, and thus became a staple for the less affluent people in Tokyo.

Due to the industrialisation efforts of the Shogunate, there were many construction workers who were mostly single men who either did not know how to cook or were too tired after work. Sushi was the easiest option, and fast became one of the most popular options for food.

However, it wasn’t until the early to mid 1900s that its popularity spread around Japan, as this was when technology caught up and made refrigeration and transportation easier.

Read More: 10 Things Not To Do When You Eat Sushi In Japan

2. Women shaved their eyebrows after marriage (amongst other things!)

Edo Period Beauty Standards

It’s often the case that beauty is in the eye …continue reading

    

Best Tourist Spots in Kurashiki

Have you heard of Kurashiki (倉敷), a charming Japanese town that is known for its Edo Period canal district and old storehouses? The Ohara Museum and Ivy Square with historical significance but a trendy feel to it are other attractions of Kurashiki. Chances are that this is the first time you learn about what’s called the ‘Venice of Japan’, and that is because it is not on the average international tourists’ radar yet. Local Japanese tourists already know about the charms of this city in Okayama Prefecture though, and we would like to introduce the best tourist spots in Kurashiki to you as well! History of Kurashiki During the Heian […]

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Woman’s Japanese countryside life with dogs has people thinking she’s living out Ghibli movies

Source: grapee.jp

With many beloved animation giant Studio Ghibli’s films being set in Japan, it’s not exactly a surprise that you can run into areas that seem to recreate Ghibli anime magic in real life when you explore the country.

Japanese YouTube channel wan life (Dog’s life) very much shows an area and lifestyle with that Ghibli aesthetic in spades, as it covers the daily relaxing adventures of a woman and her three dogs who live at the foot of Mount Kai-komagatake, which straddles Hokuto City, Yamanashi Prefecture and Ina City, Nagano Prefecture.

The charming “slow life” videos have gained quite a following, with many finding themselves soothed by the “in harmony with nature” aura that each video gives off–which shouldn’t be surprising as the channel’s uploader has been living in the area for 26 years.

There’s some DIY appeal to be seen, as you watch her boil wild vegetables from the forest and make them into salads or deep fry them on skewers, all with the company of her three canine friends who seem more than happy to explore the almost fairytale like setting.

Watching her introduce her home, which looks right out of a Studio Ghibli film, is also a treat, as are how she impalements simple items purchased from 100-yen store Seria into her daily living.

Those looking for some real life Studio Ghibli aesthetic, DIY tips, or simply something soothing ASMR and visual stimulation may want to check in on dog’s life on YouTube!

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Yoshiwara – Discover The Old Tokyo Red Light District of Edo Period

Yoshiwara Tokyo Edo Red Light District 3

Most people will know Tokyo’s red-light district as Kabukicho, but this wasn’t always the case. Throughout a huge chunk of history, Old Tokyo’s red-light district actually lay nearby to Asakusa, in an area once known as Yoshiwara.

It goes against the grains of social norms today to speak casually and openly about the activities commonly associated with red light districts.

Yet back in the days when Yoshiwara was arguably the most popular destination across Japan, visitors were rampant and it was not uncommon or even stigmatised to marry a woman from the district.

This relatively unknown part of Tokyo’s history is full of eye-opening, albeit some dark, facts that you might find interesting to learn. Let’s discover more Yoshiwara!

History Of Yoshiwara

Whilst most areas of Old Japan have carried over to current areas that exist today, Yoshiwara is not one of them. Circa medieval Japan, prostitution was widespread, and growing. The Edo shogun then confined it to somewhere on the outskirts of today’s Ningyocho.

This became known as Japan’s first ever red-light district.

However, it didn’t last long as in 1657, the Great Fire of Meireki burnt the entire place to the ground. Yoshiwara was then moved to a new district, somewhere within the north of today’s Asakusa, and thus became the greatest entertainment district across all of Edo.

Yoshiwara Tokyo Edo Red Light District 2

At one point in time, it is believed that Yoshiwara employed more than 9000 women in this district. Most lived out their lives as prostitutes, waiting behind bars at establishments until men chose them to spend the night with. Some, however, were lucky enough to become apprentices to high-ranking oirans and …continue reading