Category Archives: JOBS

2021 Top Jobs in Japan Week 4

Source: Gaijin Pot

If you’re looking to work in Japan, check back here each week as we look through our database of top jobs in Japan posted to GaijinPot and showcase some of the most interesting ones. You can apply directly to these companies by creating a profile on GaijinPot Jobs!

Waseda University Public Relations

Waseda University Public Relations / Web Communications

  • Company: Waseda University Public Relations
  • Salary: ¥242,000 ~ ¥262,000 / Month
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Native level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Waseda University, one of the most prestigious universities in Japan, is looking for a PR person to maintain its website by creating original content and managing its social media assets.

You must be fluent in Japanese to fit the working environment. The ideal candidate will have experience in using WordPress and social media platforms.

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Apply Here

Keywords International

Team Coordinator, Player Support

  • Company: Keywords International
  • Salary: ¥380,000 ~ ¥380,000 / Month
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

As a team coordinator, you will be joining the customer support team and responsible for supporting the popular mobile game Supercell.

You will ensure each agent is providing the best customer service and help improve player experience for titles such as Clash Royale, Brawl Stars, Clash of Clans and Hay Day.

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Apply Here

Edge International

Copyeditor

  • Company: Edge International
  • Salary: ¥3.0M ~ ¥4.8M / Year
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Native level
  • Japanese: Business level
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Edge International, providing corporate management services in Japan, …continue reading

    

What you need to know about getting a work visa in Japan

With around two million expatriates currently residing in Japan, the idea that Japan is closed to or very difficult for foreigners to find work is becoming more and more dated. With the right visa, there are many work opportunities in Japan. The right visa however is the key, as Japans visa system is somewhat bloated with bureaucracy and can be complicated for new arrivals, or even veterans of the system. The good news however is that this is Japan after all, and so long as you follow the procedures correctly, things usually go fairly smoothly.

Today let’s have a look at these procedures, and answer some questions such as “What kind of Visa do I need for this job”, “Do I need a university degree for a visa in Japan” and more.

How to get your first Work Visa in Japan

It is often said that the first work visa is the hardest to get in Japan. This idea comes from the fact that more companies would rather hire someone who is in country, and already has a work visa, rather than go through the sponsorship process. Whilst this advice is still true, it is getting easier to find a position that will sponsor the first visa. The good news is that there are many inroads to a work visa in Japan, and changing work visa type is easier than starting from zero (more on work visa types later).

One of the most common first visa’s for people from English speaking countries is as an English teacher. English schools and public schools in Japan are constantly on the hunt for new English teachers, and such jobs that offer visa sponsorship are plenty. The Jet Programme is also another such inroad to a visa in Japan. However English teaching jobs are not the only …continue reading

    

The Coronavirus and English Teacher Recruiting in Japan for 2021: Your Questions Answered

Source: Gaijin Pot

In an average year, January is the month when new teacher recruitment would kick into high gear because January is when applicants would start to hear back about interviews for jobs they applied for in November and December.

Unfortunately, thanks to the spread of the new coronavirus, the job market looks quite different in Japan in 2021. Understanding why this year’s job market is different and the best way to navigate it could be the key to landing a better job come spring.

To help readers who might have questions and concerns regarding applying for or changing jobs this year, let’s address some of them.

Will the job market be more or less competitive?

There are fewer competing candidates in the teaching industry.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve probably noticed traveling in or to Japan has been impossible for foreigners. With infection numbers spiking in Tokyo, a new entry ban into the country for nonresidents came into force shortly before the new year. This ban is unlikely to be relaxed while the state of emergency remains in place.

In the best case scenario, most predict immigration restrictions won’t end until after the vaccine rollout begins, probably no earlier than March. This means out-of-country job seekers won’t have enough time to go through the full hiring process, which typically ends by April. Companies are instead sourcing candidates who are already in Japan to compensate.

Making things even more complicated is the fact that many teachers from the U.S., the U.K. and other areas affected by the pandemic who are here in Japan, are opting to extend their intended length of stay by at least another year. According to teachers I’ve spoken with recently, one factor informing their decision to stay put for the …continue reading

    

2021 Top Jobs in Japan Week 3

Source: Gaijin Pot

If you’re looking to work in Japan, check back here each week as we look through our database of top jobs in Japan posted to GaijinPot and showcase some of the most interesting ones. You can apply directly to these companies by creating a profile on GaijinPot Jobs!

Waseda University Public Relations

Waseda University Public Relations / Web Communications

  • Company: Waseda University Public Relations
  • Salary: ¥242,000 ~ ¥262,000 / Month
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Native level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Waseda University, one of the most prestigious universities in Japan, is looking for a PR person to maintain its website by creating original content and managing its social media assets.

You must be fluent in Japanese to fit the working environment. The ideal candidate will have experience in using WordPress and social media platforms.

Share this Job

Apply Here

Keywords International

Team Coordinator, Player Support

  • Company: Keywords International
  • Salary: ¥380,000 ~ ¥380,000 / Month
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

As a team coordinator, you will be joining the customer support team and responsible for supporting the popular mobile game Supercell.

You will ensure each agent is providing the best customer service and help improve player experience for titles such as Clash Royale, Brawl Stars, Clash of Clans and Hay Day.

Share this Job

Apply Here

Edge International

Copyeditor

  • Company: Edge International
  • Salary: ¥3.0M ~ ¥4.8M / Year
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Native level
  • Japanese: Business level
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Edge International, providing corporate management services in Japan, …continue reading

    

Japanese politicians want workers across country to have option for three-day weekends every week

Shorter workweek would help fight coronavirus, allow more time for family and education, proponents say.

Overall, I think we’re all in agreement that the coronavirus pandemic has been a net negative. If you squint, though, you might be able to spot a silver lining around the gigantic corona-cloud, and part of that is Japan finally rethinking some of its work culture norms.

We’ve already seen many Japanese businesses implement telecommuting options for the first time in their histories, leading to a reduction in all-hands meetings about nothing and mandatory company drinking parties. Now comes another proposal that’s likely to be popular with workers: a government-backed system that would allow workers in Japan to work only four days a week.

The idea is being spearheaded by Japanese politician Kuniko Inoguchi, a member of the House of Councillors representing a district of Chiba Prefecture. Inoguchi, who’s part of the Liberal Democratic Party, is introducing a proposal that would establish a framework wherein workers in Japan could opt for a four-day workweek while still being guaranteed that they can keep their jobs. Citing examples of companies in Japan that have already implemented such systems, the proposal declares “We have seen that Japan has a latent ability to create flexible work environments and workstyles.”

By reducing the number of workers in offices and on commuter trains on a given day, the proposal would have a positive effect on anti-coronavirus efforts. However, that’s not its only goal. Other hoped-for benefits of letting people have a three-day weekend every week are giving them more time in their schedules for taking care of children or elderly relatives, pursuing educational opportunities such as graduate courses, and allowing them to explore side business ventures.

▼ Odds are this guy isn’t thinking “Man, I wish I was in the office right now…”

<img src="https://soranews24.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2021/01/TW-3.jpg?w=640" alt="" …continue reading

    

5 Ways Telework is Changing Life in Tokyo for the Better

Compared with companies in the U.S. and the E.U., many Japanese companies were hesitant to adopt telework. That is, until March of 2020, when, as Tokyo shut down, many companies were forced to implement telework systems. According to a survey by the Cabinet Office, more than half of those living in the 23 wards of the capital had experienced teleworking by June. Even now, the metropolitan government is implementing new systems to keep encouraging telework.

This new way of doing things has taken some getting used to, for both the companies and employees. Telework also has some drawbacks that still need to be addressed, for example, a lack of face-to-face communication. However, the silver lining to the cloud that was 2020, is that telework has often changed life for the better, especially in such a dense, work-driven metropolis like Tokyo.

1. Work + Vacation = Workcation

If you’re working from home… do you actually have to be at home? Why not work somewhere else? Somewhere nicer? Workcations started in the 2000’s with I.T. companies in the U.S., but they have only just become popular in Japan, particularly this year. The idea of an escape to somewhere more peaceful, surrounded by nature, is an especially attractive prospect for those living in large cities like Tokyo.

Both Wakayama and Mie prefectures are promoting themselves as ideal locations for these working vacations, by improving their internet connectivity and even transforming buildings like old schools and kominka into office spaces. However, workcations aren’t just for staying at resorts, I know some people who have taken advantage of their telework situation to spend time with their family in the countryside. The Japanese government is even subsidizing people to leave cities and telework in the countryside.

<img loading="lazy" src="https://jobsinjapan.com/wpdata/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/commuters.jpg" alt="" width="1200" height="800" srcset="https://jobsinjapan.com/wpdata/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/commuters.jpg 1200w, https://jobsinjapan.com/wpdata/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/commuters-600×400.jpg 600w, https://jobsinjapan.com/wpdata/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/commuters-1024×683.jpg …continue reading

    

(Podcast) Turning Youtube Into a Job in Japan

This week I introduce my new cohost, Anming, and we go over how to make Youtube a job while in Japan, or anywhere else really. Feedback is especially important on this episode, since this is a pretty big change over the past 500 episodes. Let me know what you think and onwards and upwards we go.

Right-Click to Download the Mp3


[Follow James: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Youtube]

[Follow Anming: Instagram | Youtube]

This show is proudly sponsored by JobsinJapan.com!

For your first job in Japan, your next job in Japan, your best job in Japan, go to JobsinJapan.com.


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Thanks for listening!


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The post (Podcast) Turning Youtube Into a Job in Japan appeared first on JobsInJapan.com.

…continue reading

    

2021 Top Jobs in Japan Week 2

Source: Gaijin Pot

If you’re looking to work in Japan, check back here each week as we look through our database of top jobs in Japan posted to GaijinPot and showcase some of the most interesting ones. You can apply directly to these companies by creating a profile on GaijinPot Jobs

Eri Clinic Omotesando

Vietnamese Interpreter / International Affairs

  • Company: Eri Clinic Omotesando
  • Salary: ¥250,000 ~ ¥350,000 / Month Negotiable
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Business level
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

This beauty clinic in Tokyo is looking for a Vietnamese speaking person to handle communications with potential customers in Vietnam and perform various translation and interpretation tasks.

You must have at least JLPT N1 and an interest for the beauty and health industries.

Share this Job

Apply Here

Tokyo American Club

Fitness Supervisor

  • Company: Tokyo American Club
  • Salary: ¥375,000 ~ ¥541,000 / Month
  • Location: Nihonbashi, Tokyo
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

In this position, you will be directly involved in the physical exercise programs and fitness activities for members.

You must have CPR and First Aid training as well as a certification as a personal trainer or exercise instructor.

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Apply Here

Tokyo American Club (東京アメリカンクラブ)

Fitness Attendant

  • Company: Tokyo American Club (東京アメリカンクラブ)
  • Salary: ¥2.3M ~ ¥3.2M / Year
  • Location: Nihonbashi, Tokyo
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

The Tokyo American Club is looking for a fitness attendant to assist users with their workout regimens, show them how to use the spectrum of cutting-technology equipment and make sure the fitness center runs smoothly and safely.

You should be …continue reading

    

Eight things people realized were pointless about Japanese work culture during 2020

The coronavirus has disrupted everyone’s lifestyle, but it’s disrupted some of the bad parts too.

As the new year starts, a lot of people in Japan are hoping that it’ll be more like one of the old ones. Not 2020, of course, but one of those nice, pre-pandemic years.

Getting back to the old normal isn’t as quick and easy as turning the page on a calendar, though, and right now the coronavirus is still very much affecting daily life. But it’s important to take the good with the bad, so a recent survey by Japanese Internet portal Biglobe asked Japanese workers, many of whom have transitioned to telecommuting, what they don’t miss about their old workdays.

Specifically, the survey asked “During 2020, what did you come to feel was a pointless waste of time and energy about your old workstyle?” Responses were collected from 1,000 people aged 20 to 69 (with multiple responses), and here are the top results.

8. Chitchatting with coworkers (chosen by 7.4 percent of respondents)

Sure, a little office banter is nice. But if you have a coworker who’s constantly yammering on and on and on about their pet snake, lousy ex, or new workout routine? Then silence is golden.

▼ “…yes, thank you for the ticket to the ‘gun show.’ It was mildly impressive. Now please let me get back to work.”

7. Visiting clients’ offices (13 percent)
6. Business trips (14 percent)
5. My office (14.2 percent)

Negotiations are a necessary part of doing business. But why bother spending an hour going across town when you can handle everything with a 15-minute phone call or video chat?

▼ It’s not like shaking hands is part of Japanese business culture.

<img src="https://soranews24.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2021/01/DM-3.jpg?w=640" alt="" width="640" height="258" …continue reading

    

Will Your Work-Life Balance Demand Discourage a Prospective Japanese Employer?

It was in 2016, on Christmas Eve, a day never to forget by a mother of a beautiful 24-year old young lady, who decided to take her own life only eight months after starting her dream job. It was not, by any means, the first suicide case of a young person in Japan, nor was it the first excessive overtime work-related casualty. It was not, either, the first case involving an employee from the same company, the giant Japanese advertising and public relations agency, Dentsu.

They say, it was precisely because she was young and beautiful that it brought plenty of public attention and, arguably, marked the start of a period towards work-life balance reforms. We could answer the headline question with a Yes or No, and backed it up with statistics from somewhere, but we would be missing the bigger and broader picture, which is rich in content and context. In case you are like some of those from the famous marshmallow test [the group of kids who could not resist immediate gratification as opposed to those who preferred to wait in exchange of greater rewards], I am sorry to disappoint you, because, as a matter of fact, there is no straight yes or no answer here. But if you give yourself some dose of patience, I promise you will be in position to draw your own conclusion.

Overtime work in Japan

For many decades Japan hasn’t been great in terms of overtime work and work-life balance. Although it is not the worst in the world or among the OECD countries, but, among the most advanced countries it is lagging behind. There is plenty of literature about how Japan came to have such infamous reputation, but it is said, by some, that there was no choice. One could easily say …continue reading