Category Archives: JOBS

2021 Top Jobs in Japan Week 5

Source: Gaijin Pot

If you’re looking to work in Japan, check back here each week as we look through our database of top jobs in Japan posted to GaijinPot and showcase some of the most interesting ones. You can apply directly to these companies by creating a profile on GaijinPot Jobs!

Writer (Translator J to E)

  • Company: The IR Corporation
  • Salary: ¥4.0M / Year Negotiable
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Native level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

The IR Corporation is looking for a full-time writer to translate various documents and material from Japanese to English.

You must have native-level English, be precise and be able to respect tight deadlines.

Duties will focus on the translation of integrated reports, news releases, corporate brochures, results summaries, roadshow presentations or corporate websites from various industries.

Part-time or semi-full-time positions will be also considered upon request.

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Waseda University Public Relations

Waseda University Public Relations / Web Communications

  • Company: Waseda University Public Relations
  • Salary: ¥242,000 ~ ¥262,000 / Month
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Native level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Waseda University, one of the most prestigious universities in Japan, is looking for a PR person to maintain its website by creating original content and managing its social media assets.

You must be fluent in Japanese to fit the working environment. The ideal candidate will have experience in using WordPress and social media platforms.

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Apply Here

Keywords International

Team Coordinator, Player Support

  • Company: Keywords International
  • Salary: ¥380,000 ~ ¥380,000 / Month
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently …continue reading
        

(Podcast) Charley from ZenMarket

This week Charley drops in to talk with me and Anming about how he started his career in Japan with startups, ending up with his current HR position with Zenmarket.

Right-Click to Download the Mp3


[Follow James: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Youtube]

[Follow Anming: Instagram | Youtube]

This show is proudly sponsored by JobsinJapan.com!

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Thanks for listening!


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The post (Podcast) Charley from ZenMarket appeared first on JobsInJapan.com.

…continue reading

    

The Benefits of Living in Rural Japan

The majority of jobs in Japan are clustered in large cities like Tokyo and Osaka. It’s commonly believed by both Japanese people and foreigners that in order to be successful, you need to work or study in the capital city. However, there are some occupations that’ll have you living out in the inaka (countryside).

For instance, many English teaching jobs are at schools in rural areas. Furthermore, thanks to the rise of remote work, some people are choosing to relocate to rural areas. There are many benefits of living in rural Japan. The cost of living is cheap, and you can live closer to nature. Additionally, you have the opportunity to learn about cultural practices and traditions specific to the region you live in. If you’re thinking about relocating or applying to work in the countryside, keep reading! We’ll tell you what it’s like to live in rural Japan.

You’ll Get to Experience a More Traditional Japanese Lifestyle

Foreigners living in cities like Tokyo can expect to have some of the comforts of home around. Although it might be smaller, a modern Japanese apartment probably doesn’t look too different from where you lived back home. With restaurants like McDonalds, Shake Shack, and KFC, you can enjoy the fast food you grew up eating. Moreover, you can go to imported goods stores like Seijoishii or Jupiter to pick up liquor, snacks, and food from around the world. Depending on how remote of an area you live in, there will be few, if any, of these luxuries available. You can order some nonperishables online, but you should expect to be eating more Japanese food if you move to the countryside.

Food isn’t the only thing that’s more traditional in rural areas. There are a lot more old buildings and houses in the …continue reading

    

Woman in Japan disciplined after putting up partition between herself and older male coworker

City hall worker denies man’s physical handicap was part of her motivation.

One unique aspect of Japanese work culture is the lack of cubicles or private offices. Instead, coworkers sit side by side at long tables, like the one shown above.

It’s believed that this more open layout helps foster communication, empathy, and teamwork. However, when a man in Kagoshima Prefecture, on Japan’s southwest island of Kyushu, showed up for work he discovered that the coworker who sits next to him had decided to do some remodeling by putting up a barrier between his desk and hers.

That morning, the 50-something man’s female employee and table neighbor, who is in her 20s, had arrived at the office before him and set up a partition made of black cardboard between their sections of the table. The barrier was about 40 centimeters (15.7 inches) tall and 50 centimeters long, large enough so that the two of them couldn’t see each other if seated.

That probably would have made for an awkward shift, but instead of clocking in the man, feeling bullied, went home. The incident occurred on October 16 and the man hasn’t been back to work since. He’s since been diagnosed with adjustment disorder and is currently on sick leave.

The woman kept the partition up for the first few days even after the man stopped coming to work, but has since taken it down. However, she is now being disciplined for her actions, which the city hall administration has deemed “inappropriate.” When asked why she put up the partition, the woman said “Working with him has been a recurring source of stress. I just couldn’t take it anymore, and I put up the barrier without …continue reading

    

2021 Top Jobs in Japan Week 4

Source: Gaijin Pot

If you’re looking to work in Japan, check back here each week as we look through our database of top jobs in Japan posted to GaijinPot and showcase some of the most interesting ones. You can apply directly to these companies by creating a profile on GaijinPot Jobs!

Waseda University Public Relations

Waseda University Public Relations / Web Communications

  • Company: Waseda University Public Relations
  • Salary: ¥242,000 ~ ¥262,000 / Month
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Native level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Waseda University, one of the most prestigious universities in Japan, is looking for a PR person to maintain its website by creating original content and managing its social media assets.

You must be fluent in Japanese to fit the working environment. The ideal candidate will have experience in using WordPress and social media platforms.

Share this Job

Apply Here

Keywords International

Team Coordinator, Player Support

  • Company: Keywords International
  • Salary: ¥380,000 ~ ¥380,000 / Month
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

As a team coordinator, you will be joining the customer support team and responsible for supporting the popular mobile game Supercell.

You will ensure each agent is providing the best customer service and help improve player experience for titles such as Clash Royale, Brawl Stars, Clash of Clans and Hay Day.

Share this Job

Apply Here

Edge International

Copyeditor

  • Company: Edge International
  • Salary: ¥3.0M ~ ¥4.8M / Year
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Native level
  • Japanese: Business level
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Edge International, providing corporate management services in Japan, …continue reading

    

What you need to know about getting a work visa in Japan

With around two million expatriates currently residing in Japan, the idea that Japan is closed to or very difficult for foreigners to find work is becoming more and more dated. With the right visa, there are many work opportunities in Japan. The right visa however is the key, as Japans visa system is somewhat bloated with bureaucracy and can be complicated for new arrivals, or even veterans of the system. The good news however is that this is Japan after all, and so long as you follow the procedures correctly, things usually go fairly smoothly.

Today let’s have a look at these procedures, and answer some questions such as “What kind of Visa do I need for this job”, “Do I need a university degree for a visa in Japan” and more.

How to get your first Work Visa in Japan

It is often said that the first work visa is the hardest to get in Japan. This idea comes from the fact that more companies would rather hire someone who is in country, and already has a work visa, rather than go through the sponsorship process. Whilst this advice is still true, it is getting easier to find a position that will sponsor the first visa. The good news is that there are many inroads to a work visa in Japan, and changing work visa type is easier than starting from zero (more on work visa types later).

One of the most common first visa’s for people from English speaking countries is as an English teacher. English schools and public schools in Japan are constantly on the hunt for new English teachers, and such jobs that offer visa sponsorship are plenty. The Jet Programme is also another such inroad to a visa in Japan. However English teaching jobs are not the only …continue reading

    

The Coronavirus and English Teacher Recruiting in Japan for 2021: Your Questions Answered

Source: Gaijin Pot

In an average year, January is the month when new teacher recruitment would kick into high gear because January is when applicants would start to hear back about interviews for jobs they applied for in November and December.

Unfortunately, thanks to the spread of the new coronavirus, the job market looks quite different in Japan in 2021. Understanding why this year’s job market is different and the best way to navigate it could be the key to landing a better job come spring.

To help readers who might have questions and concerns regarding applying for or changing jobs this year, let’s address some of them.

Will the job market be more or less competitive?

There are fewer competing candidates in the teaching industry.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve probably noticed traveling in or to Japan has been impossible for foreigners. With infection numbers spiking in Tokyo, a new entry ban into the country for nonresidents came into force shortly before the new year. This ban is unlikely to be relaxed while the state of emergency remains in place.

In the best case scenario, most predict immigration restrictions won’t end until after the vaccine rollout begins, probably no earlier than March. This means out-of-country job seekers won’t have enough time to go through the full hiring process, which typically ends by April. Companies are instead sourcing candidates who are already in Japan to compensate.

Making things even more complicated is the fact that many teachers from the U.S., the U.K. and other areas affected by the pandemic who are here in Japan, are opting to extend their intended length of stay by at least another year. According to teachers I’ve spoken with recently, one factor informing their decision to stay put for the …continue reading

    

2021 Top Jobs in Japan Week 3

Source: Gaijin Pot

If you’re looking to work in Japan, check back here each week as we look through our database of top jobs in Japan posted to GaijinPot and showcase some of the most interesting ones. You can apply directly to these companies by creating a profile on GaijinPot Jobs!

Waseda University Public Relations

Waseda University Public Relations / Web Communications

  • Company: Waseda University Public Relations
  • Salary: ¥242,000 ~ ¥262,000 / Month
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Native level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Waseda University, one of the most prestigious universities in Japan, is looking for a PR person to maintain its website by creating original content and managing its social media assets.

You must be fluent in Japanese to fit the working environment. The ideal candidate will have experience in using WordPress and social media platforms.

Share this Job

Apply Here

Keywords International

Team Coordinator, Player Support

  • Company: Keywords International
  • Salary: ¥380,000 ~ ¥380,000 / Month
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

As a team coordinator, you will be joining the customer support team and responsible for supporting the popular mobile game Supercell.

You will ensure each agent is providing the best customer service and help improve player experience for titles such as Clash Royale, Brawl Stars, Clash of Clans and Hay Day.

Share this Job

Apply Here

Edge International

Copyeditor

  • Company: Edge International
  • Salary: ¥3.0M ~ ¥4.8M / Year
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Native level
  • Japanese: Business level
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Edge International, providing corporate management services in Japan, …continue reading

    

Japanese politicians want workers across country to have option for three-day weekends every week

Shorter workweek would help fight coronavirus, allow more time for family and education, proponents say.

Overall, I think we’re all in agreement that the coronavirus pandemic has been a net negative. If you squint, though, you might be able to spot a silver lining around the gigantic corona-cloud, and part of that is Japan finally rethinking some of its work culture norms.

We’ve already seen many Japanese businesses implement telecommuting options for the first time in their histories, leading to a reduction in all-hands meetings about nothing and mandatory company drinking parties. Now comes another proposal that’s likely to be popular with workers: a government-backed system that would allow workers in Japan to work only four days a week.

The idea is being spearheaded by Japanese politician Kuniko Inoguchi, a member of the House of Councillors representing a district of Chiba Prefecture. Inoguchi, who’s part of the Liberal Democratic Party, is introducing a proposal that would establish a framework wherein workers in Japan could opt for a four-day workweek while still being guaranteed that they can keep their jobs. Citing examples of companies in Japan that have already implemented such systems, the proposal declares “We have seen that Japan has a latent ability to create flexible work environments and workstyles.”

By reducing the number of workers in offices and on commuter trains on a given day, the proposal would have a positive effect on anti-coronavirus efforts. However, that’s not its only goal. Other hoped-for benefits of letting people have a three-day weekend every week are giving them more time in their schedules for taking care of children or elderly relatives, pursuing educational opportunities such as graduate courses, and allowing them to explore side business ventures.

▼ Odds are this guy isn’t thinking “Man, I wish I was in the office right now…”

<img src="https://soranews24.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2021/01/TW-3.jpg?w=640" alt="" …continue reading

    

5 Ways Telework is Changing Life in Tokyo for the Better

Compared with companies in the U.S. and the E.U., many Japanese companies were hesitant to adopt telework. That is, until March of 2020, when, as Tokyo shut down, many companies were forced to implement telework systems. According to a survey by the Cabinet Office, more than half of those living in the 23 wards of the capital had experienced teleworking by June. Even now, the metropolitan government is implementing new systems to keep encouraging telework.

This new way of doing things has taken some getting used to, for both the companies and employees. Telework also has some drawbacks that still need to be addressed, for example, a lack of face-to-face communication. However, the silver lining to the cloud that was 2020, is that telework has often changed life for the better, especially in such a dense, work-driven metropolis like Tokyo.

1. Work + Vacation = Workcation

If you’re working from home… do you actually have to be at home? Why not work somewhere else? Somewhere nicer? Workcations started in the 2000’s with I.T. companies in the U.S., but they have only just become popular in Japan, particularly this year. The idea of an escape to somewhere more peaceful, surrounded by nature, is an especially attractive prospect for those living in large cities like Tokyo.

Both Wakayama and Mie prefectures are promoting themselves as ideal locations for these working vacations, by improving their internet connectivity and even transforming buildings like old schools and kominka into office spaces. However, workcations aren’t just for staying at resorts, I know some people who have taken advantage of their telework situation to spend time with their family in the countryside. The Japanese government is even subsidizing people to leave cities and telework in the countryside.

<img loading="lazy" src="https://jobsinjapan.com/wpdata/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/commuters.jpg" alt="" width="1200" height="800" srcset="https://jobsinjapan.com/wpdata/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/commuters.jpg 1200w, https://jobsinjapan.com/wpdata/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/commuters-600×400.jpg 600w, https://jobsinjapan.com/wpdata/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/commuters-1024×683.jpg …continue reading