Category Archives: JOBS

Hiring Red Flags – Part 1 (Pre-Interview)

Have you ever made a bad hire? We all have.

Before we begin, I would like to take a quick one question survey

When you make a bad hire, what annoys you the most:

  1. Loss of productivity (further behind schedule)
  2. Loss of money invested in hiring candidate
  3. Potential damage (unhappy clients) due to failed hire
  4. Own time being wasted.
  5. Your own and staff’s ability to judge a good hire being off
  6. All of the above

Amazing, everyone selected “F” as their answer.

Wherever I get “buyers remorse” after hiring a candidate, I blame myself and wonder what I should have done differently. After a long career in HR and in Sales, I thought my internal lie-detector was much better than the job seeker’s ability to lie. I second-guess myself as to what questions I should have asked in the interview, what clues I did not pick up on, did my desperation to hire someone cause me to mis-sell (convince) myself that the candidate was a great fit. I am as guilty as all of us in making the same mistakes.

Fortunately, running a job board gives me a very large network of hiring professionals which I often turn to for advice. Here are some of the tips I use and have been suggested to me by respected hiring managers.

Disclaimer: None of these tips are, in itself, proof that the applicant is going to make for a bad hire. Just little warning signs and to proceed caution.

This first list are Pre-Interview warning signs. That is after you have identified the person as worthy of being invited for an interview. I trust you have screened the application for unexplained gaps in employment history, fabrications, spelling/grammar errors, not being qualified, etc.

Pre-Interview

  • Rescheduling – After confirming with the applicant on a mutually convenient to hold the interview, please take caution if you …continue reading
        

2020 Top Jobs in Japan Week 51

Source: Gaijin Pot

If you’re looking to work in Japan, check back here each week as we look through our database of top jobs in Japan posted to GaijinPot and showcase some of the most interesting ones. You can apply directly to these companies by creating a profile on GaijinPot Jobs!

EKO Instruments

Visual Designer

  • Company: EKO Instruments
  • Salary: Salary negotiable
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Business level
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

The visual designer will create graphics for print and online use, including but not limited to: print ads, product guides, catalogs, social media images, booth design, templates and more.

Proficiency in design tools and software (Adobe CC) is mandatory plus a good working background related to marketing visuals making.

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EKO Instruments

Marketing Assistant

  • Company: EKO Instruments
  • Salary: Salary negotiable
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Business level
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Eko Instruments, a company designing and manufacturing renewable energy instruments, is looking for a marketing assistant to help support its national and global campaigns, public relations activities, online marketing and other communications initiatives.

You must have a degree in marketing or communications or have at least one to two years experience in a B2B marketing role.

Business level in both English and Japanese is mandatory. Knowledge in HTML/CSS and experience with paid social/Google Ads is a plus.

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Equiom Japan

Office Administrator

  • Company: Equiom Japan
  • Salary: ¥200,000 ~ ¥230,000 / Month, Negotiable
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Business level
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Equiom, a company outsourcing accounting, payroll and financial services in Japan, is …continue reading

    

What do Japanese Companies Care About the Most When Hiring Foreigners?

One of the advantages of being in the recruitment world in countries such as Japan, dealing with foreigners, is that you get to know, first hand, about work-related intricacies from around the world. If you meet folks from Argentina or India, to mention a couple, you will hear that there is a negative connotation to staying in a company for too long [there is not a clear cut off number of years to be considered long enough, but apparently, 3 does the mark]. For many, it seems detrimental to your career prospects.

In Japan, employees’ foot looseness is becoming a more accepted new phenomenon – and young generations are accused of setting the tone – but, as we will see, most Japanese Shachous (Japanese word for the companies’ president) or hiring managers still appreciate the opposite, staying longer.

What other things do Japanese bosses care about the most when hiring gaikokujin (Japanese word for foreign nationals)?

If you have been cherishing the idea of working in Japan, probably by now you have already read plenty of dos and don’ts in the world of work in Japan.
This does not intent to be a myth-busting article – to avoid adding more wood to the fire of confusion that you might be already getting in. We will try something more useful; to focus on, arguably, the three most important ones to be aware of.*

These are: long-term commitment; willingness to absorb the culture; and willingness to learn the language.

1.For how long are you planning to stay?

Around the world, lifelong employment is said to be a thing of the past. Japan does not escape from this trend. To make things worse, for long-term relationship lovers, young generations are said to be willing to change jobs more often than how their parents or grant parents did.

But don’t be fast …continue reading

    

(Podcast) Dispatch Companies – What You Need to Know to be Successful!

This week I go over a great video that you all should check out about 3 hidden truths of dispatch English teaching companies. Go watch the video first, then listen to this for maximum satisfaction. Enjoy! (I also talk about Interac’s newest video about 5 myths about the company.)

Right-Click to Download the Mp3


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This show is proudly sponsored by JobsinJapan.com!

For your first job in Japan, your next job in Japan, your best job in Japan, go to JobsinJapan.com.


Every episode of the podcast is available on iTunes, Android, and Stitcher. Make sure to subscribe to the show so that you don’t miss out on any new episodes as they’re released. All ratings and reviews are also greatly appreciated.

Thanks for listening!


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The post (Podcast) Dispatch Companies – What You Need to Know to be Successful! appeared first on JobsInJapan.com.

…continue reading

    

What You Need To Know To Find An English Teaching Job In Japan

Teaching English in Japan can be a rewarding experience, as well as a great way to get your life in Japan started. Every year literally hundreds of positions open all across Japan. Most jobs for expats in Japan are focused in the big cities like Tokyo and Osaka, but teaching English opens up the possibility to work in smaller cities, towns and villages. How can you begin a career as an English teacher in Japan? What experience and training do you need? What kind of salary can you expect?

Let’s have a look at these questions and more.

How Can I be an English Teacher in Japan?

The only strict prerequisite to become an English teacher in Japan is a higher education degree, but it does not need to be a degree in English language or education. The degree should however have been attained in English. This not only proves you are fluent in the language, but also allows a company to sponsor your working visa. There are English positions available to job hunters without a higher education degree, but you will need some form of working visa, such as a working holiday visa. These positions are also somewhat less desirable, often with low wages and teaching to pre-school children. If you want to get the best out of teaching English in Japan, having a degree is fundamental.

If you satisfy that condition, then yes! You can be an English teacher in Japan. The industry is constantly hiring, so positions are relatively easy to come by. The average teacher stays for two to three years, so better positions also often open up. The hiring season for English teachers in Japan starts in January so get your resume uploaded to have first crack at all the best English teaching jobs.

What Kind …continue reading

    

2020 Top Jobs in Japan Week 50

Source: Gaijin Pot

If you’re looking to work in Japan, check back here each week as we look through our database of top jobs in Japan posted to GaijinPot and showcase some of the most interesting ones. You can apply directly to these companies by creating a profile on GaijinPot Jobs!

Equiom Japan

Office Administrator

  • Company: Equiom Japan
  • Salary: ¥200,000 ~ ¥230,000 / Month, Negotiable
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Business level
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Equiom, a company outsourcing accounting, payroll and financial services in Japan, is looking for an office administrator for its Tokyo location.

Your main duty will be administration tasks (filing, scanning, answering phones, general office management) as well as assisting the accounting and payroll teams as needed.

You must be proficient in Microsoft Office applications. Business level of English and Japanese required. Previous experience in a similar role welcomed.

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Wayfarer

Hospitality General Manager / Senior Associate

  • Company: Wayfarer
  • Salary: Salary negotiable
  • Location: Kyoto, Japan
  • English: Fluent
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Wayfarer, a hospitality company operating a portfolio of properties in Tokyo and Kyoto, is looking for a general manager to lead operational processes and guest services to drive higher profits, reviews and up sell partners at its facility in Kyoto.

You must have experience in the hospitality industry. Fluency in English and Japanese in a must.

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G-7 Crown Trading Co., Ltd.

International Sales Executive

  • Company: G-7 Crown Trading Co., Ltd.
  • Salary: ¥200,000 ~ ¥1.0M / Month, Negotiable, Commission Based
  • Location: Kanagawa, Japan
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Conversational
  • Application: Must currently …continue reading
        

10 Tips For Changing Careers in Japan: Job Hunting while Employed

Considering switching careers in Japan? You aren’t alone––tenshoku (転職), or changing jobs, is more common than ever, contrary to the days of Japan’s stable “lifetime employment” system, where loyalty to a single company was key. While there are hurdles for foreigners, the job market is brimming with opportunities for a happier and more fulfilling career. It is easy to search for new opportunities, interview, and land a new job, even while working full-time. Use the tips below to help start a new chapter in your professional life in Japan seamlessly.

1. Update your Resumes in English and Japanese

One of the first steps to starting your job search in any country is to update your resume. If you are seeking a position that uses your multilingual skills or are going to be working at a Japanese company, you should do this for English and Japanese.

You will also want to create up-to-date versions of your shokumu keirekisho (職務経歴書) and rirekisho (履歴書). There are many online resources with templates and suggested formats for these documents. Keep in mind that creating a new rirekisho will require a recent photo. Take advantage of a photo booth or ask a friend to take a professional-looking picture to make the best impression.

2. Decide your Timeline

While you document your latest qualifications and experience, you should also determine a realistic timeline for your job search. You can typically expect to take between three and six months to find a new job, depending on the job and industry you are in. In addition, determine any special factors that may affect you.

Do you want to wait until a certain project at your current work finishes? How much notice do you have to give at your current employer before quitting? When does your residence card expire?

Keeping track of your job …continue reading

    

Lawson to post super-temp positions online, let anyone work suddenly-open shifts at stores

Speedrunning part-time work.

Japanese convenience store chain Lawson has been at the forefront of new ideas, ranging from good, like their entirely self-serve shops, to the not-so-good, like chocolate potato burgers.

But recently Lawson has released some information about a new policy they’ve instituted, starting this month: in order to fill shifts, stores can put up listings online up to three hours before it starts, letting anyone apply and work the very temporary slots.

▼ “Excuse me, do you work here?”
“Yeah, I had some downtime at the cosplay convention, so I picked up a shift.”

Lawson has said that their aim in implementing this system is to both fill empty shits left by absent employees, and as a way to give housewives, students, and others a way to fill up free time if they want to work and make some extra money.

The system’s trial run is being implemented between this month and February in Tokyo, Saitama, and Chiba, with plans to expand to all stores in the country in the future. Hopefully the limited trial run will help them work out any kinks before its more widespread usage.

Because according to Japanese netizens, there are a lot of kinks already:

“Even if you have experience, all stores have their own rules, so it’s gonna be hard.”
“Working a convenience store requires a ton of varied knowledge though….”
“This is just going to result in more work for the regulars coaching the newbie.”
“Sounds like a perfect way for someone to work the register and steal money.”
“How are they even going to keep track of everyone they need to pay?”
“I could easily see some temp people not getting paid from this.”
“It’s impossible to train someone for convenience store work in that short time.”

There were others who …continue reading

    

(Podcast) Late 2020 Japan Job Market Mini-Rundown

This week Peter from JobsinJapan.com dropped in to give us a direct line to the current pulse of the job market in Japan. Are things improving? Still doom and gloom? Is it actually a GOOD time to be looking for a job in Japan? All this, and a complete overview of the great new resume interview feature over at JobsinJapan.com.

Check a rundown of the video interview here -> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HjDHlQ5qzGs

Right-Click to Download the Mp3


[Check out the Interview Feature Here: Youtube]

[Follow the Show: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Youtube]

This show is proudly sponsored by JobsinJapan.com!

For your first job in Japan, your next job in Japan, your best job in Japan, go to JobsinJapan.com.


Every episode of the podcast is available on iTunes, Android, and Stitcher. Make sure to subscribe to the show so that you don’t miss out on any new episodes as they’re released. All ratings and reviews are also greatly appreciated.

Thanks for listening!


Want to Leave a Review? You are a legend: iTunes

The post (Podcast) Late 2020 Japan Job Market Mini-Rundown appeared first on JobsInJapan.com.

…continue reading

    

Why to choose Japan as your next work destination?

There is this popular saying in Latin America, “En todas partes cuecen habas” (they cook beans everywhere). For simplicity, let’s take it as there are imperfections everywhere, and Japan is not the exception. This country of the rising sun has problems of its own, but the factors that make it an attractive place for living, and yes, also for work, more than offset its ugly sides.

In the following lines, we offer a perspective why you should give it a serious thought to relocating to Japan if you are thinking of your next country to live and work.

Overall, it has to do a lot with the opportunities laying ahead due to macro trends, structural changes, intrinsic factors that made Japan one of the most powerful economies in the world, and serendipity. This confluence of changes and macro trends is making Japan a place of opportunities.

Aging, low birthrate and the shrinking labor force

It’s been written enough about it. There is barely a single day without the news mentioning the severe labor force shrinkage. And there is no sign of significant change unless more foreigners are brought in, which has been the trend in the last years.

The Japanese monotsukuri strength

Monotsukuri stands for manufacturing things, and it is one of the Japanese prides. But to understand its meaning, to its fullest, you need to refer to one fact that receives little attention. Japan is the leader of economic complexity, index developed by an MIT and Harvard professors, that measures how diversified a country is and how much productive knowledge it has. No wonder why Japan is also one of the leaders in patent fillings in the world.

A very welcome guest in a turmoil-infested world

Last but not the least. Japan is pretty much a safe country, and this is …continue reading